Patrick Nunn


Zubin Kanga tours Morphosis in Australia and Hudderfield Festival

Morphosis goes to Cheltenham Festival and NIME, Brisbane

Pareidolia I accepted for Sonorities Festival, Belfast

Rarescale feature Gonk and Shadowplay at The Forge, London

New CD release Morphosis of Patrick's solo/duo works

Gonk released on Graham Sheen's new CD

Thalassa Ensemble perform Music of the Spheres and 47 Tucanae at St Cuthbert's Church NW2

Owen Murray to perform Escape Velocity at Castelfidardo Accordion Festival

Milica Milojevic features Sprite  at Canadanian Flute Convention

Zubin Kanga performs Morphosis  at Goldsmiths and IRCAM

Ensemble Matisse perform Collage on D at CCR, Paris

Rarescale perform Maqamat at the Flexible Series, RNCM

Bass clarinettist Marij van Gorkom tours Pareidolia I to Holland, Austria and the UK

Patrick has been awarded an Associate of the Royal Academy of Music

Pareidolia I shortlisted for British Composer Award

Natalie Bleitcher to perform
Music of the Spheres at Schotts Music on the 22nd November

47 Tucanae launches in new ABRSM Spectrum publication for Piano Duets - order here

Sprite features at opening of Caterbury's St Gregory's Music Centre on the 5th and 6th October

World premiere of Maya features at RNCM in the BFS international conference on the 18th August

Sprite, Prism, Transilient Fragments, Music of the Spheres, Mercurial Sparks, Volatile Shadows and 3:5, now available from Cadenza Music

Prism is released on NMC label on 18th April 2011 - order here

Sentiment of an Invisible Omniscience gets Birmingham New Millennium Prize.

Music of the Sphere released on Red Sock Records and available on CD or as a digital download.

Collage on D published in ABRSM Spectrum for violin.

Appointed Lecturer of composition at Royal Academy of Music feature - Falmouth Arts newsletter.


"My ideas proliferate from an initial response to something external - a single sound, an image, a concept - each object holding potentials that when examined at a microscopic level or distance, reveal their secrets. My responses to them becomes my obsession, and through technology, I zoom in closer or change my angle, mould and distort my objects from and to any point, creating moments of convergence, mutual influence, hybrids and illusions."

Patrick Nunn

"The 2014 work by Patrick Nunn Morphosis for Piano, 3D Sensors and Live Electronics was a show stopper... It was both beautiful and incredibly fascinating... At times Kanga was balletically performing arm movements that were complementary to the evocative sounds of the piano. The fluidity in this work was compelling." - Mariyon Slany (Performing Arts Hub, Oct 2016)

"From the moment the first chord is struck, calling forth a ghostly electronic counterpart that echoes and glides in response, this survey of works for solo, duo and electronics by British composer Patrick Nunn creates an immersive world of shifting colours, fusing the worlds of acoustic performance and electronic response that offers large moments for reflection. It is clear throughout this disc that there is a deep, organic link between instrument and the electronics, one which explores the affinity between the two rather than imposing one upon the other. Nunn’s soundworld effortlessly blends acoustic instruments with electronics, sometimes triggered directly by the physicality of the performer, as in the disc’s title track, at other times responding to it or reflecting it." - Daniel Harding (Shock Of The New, Apr 2016)

"I find [Pareidolia I] arresting... the actual sound is stunning with the tabla-like druming with the keys of the clarinet and the various ways in which he morphs the sounds. It's also biguiling sonically listening to it."
Helen Wallace (In Tune, BBC Radio 3, Dec 2012)

"Into My Burning Veins A Poison… is a very beautiful piece which cannot fail to touch audiences."
Carla Rees (Pan, Flute Magazine, March 2007)

"The jury were particularly impressed by [Mercurial Sparks, Volatile Shadows] for its clarity of concept, imaginative textures and its integrity."
(Solo and duo category jury, British Composers Awards, December 2006)

"But the true highlight was Patrick Nunn's orchestration of traditional jigs and shanties sourced by Bellowhead. The players seized on the call-and-response structure; by the end Hazlewood had become a mere spectator as this fearless young band jumped to their feet to trade improvised licks."
Alfred Hickling (The Guardian, April 2012)

"The concert closed with Patrick Nunn’s Bardstorming – an extremely loud and energetic medley of dance tunes. Members of the orchestra stood up to play semi-improvised solos, and the effect was of a gloriously anarchic busking session that earned these talented young musicians a well-deserved standing ovation."
Jane Shuttleworth (Bachtrack, April 2012)

"...the most enjoyable piece of the evening was the one that bridged that gap. This was Patrick Nunn’s Coalescence. With its slow drifting blend of clarinet and electronic sound, it fitted the ambience to a t."
Ivan Hewett (The Telegraph, November 2011)

"Sprite is an enchanting, rapid showpiece which drew a lively audience response."
Paul Kilbey (Bachtrack, January 2012)

"Patrick Nunn's puckish and mischievous piece [Sprite] for solo piccolo... is full of impish humour [and] bristles with waggish impudence."
Daniel Harding (May 2012)

"...Patrick Nunn’s Sprite – short, witty, inventive."
Richard Fairman (Financial Times, January 2012)

"Patrick Nunn's mischievous three-minute Sprite for solo piccolo was far more intoxicating than its lemonadey name suggested."
Richard Morrison (The Times, January 2012)

"Patrick Nunn's Sprite for solo piccolo had unexpected bite."
Ruth Picard (The Indendent, January 2012)

"[Sprite]... a short and witty piece for unaccompanied piccolo with teasing staccatos and numerous effects."
Colin Anderson (ClassicalSource.com, July 2012)

"Fata Morgana… fused the acoustic and electronic with panache."
Geoff Brown (The Times, June 2011)

"[Music of the Spheres]… a mesmeric listening experience."
Ruth Webster (The Shetland Times, July 2008)

"[Momenta]… sleek and airy."
Jenny Gilbert (The Independent, May 2005)